Cybersecurity NewsNews

Eurovision Fears For Potential #Cyberattack From Russian Hackers

Loading

Preparations for the Eurovision Song Contest 2023 is underway and the event’s most significant concern is a Russian cyberattack.

The UK hosting of the 2023 event for last year’s winners Ukraine in Liverpool, experts from the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) have been brought in to safeguard the contest’s public vote on Saturday.

Organizers also invited the intelligence agency, which is part of GCHQ, to offer suggestions on how to mitigate the risks of a potential cyberattack on the voting system.

Eurovision Prepares for Possible Attacks

Eurovision claimed it has top measures in place to thwart any attempt by Russian hackers. The organizers also expressed confidence in the measures they put in place.

The BBC’s Martin Green, who also led the Olympic ceremony at London 2012, said it is important to surround “yourself with the best”  to deal with any threat

However, Mr. Green from BBC said there had been a lot of testing and they are in really good shape and there is high confidence about the rest of the week to combat any attack.

Last year, Italian authorities foiled plans from Russian hacker attempt to invade the semi-finals and final of the Eurovision Song Contest.

Notably, preparations for all possible tactical attacks scenario before the competition will help protect against all attacks and sneaky actions to bypass system security.

Additionally, Quick thinking and tested response planning will act as a robust protective barrier on the night but not without concerns, tension, and pressure on all the teams.

Russian Ban A Reason For Concern

Due to its invasion of Ukraine, Eurovision barred Russia from participating. Its national broadcasters afterward discontinued their membership of the EBU, which sets up the show, preventing them from taking part in future competitions.

Equally, for the first time in the competition’s nearly seven-decade history, people from countries outside the contest can vote for their preferred act this year.

The system in place transforms votes into points that have the same significance as one of the participating countries, essentially allowing some Russian citizens opportunities to sway the vote.