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U.K Allegedly Identify China As The Culprit Behind ‘Voters Data’ Cyberattack

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On Monday, the UK government allegedly identified China as the main culprit behind millions of voter’s data cyberattack exploits.  According to the source, the government asserted that the cyberattacks that accessed the personal details of millions of voters in the UK had links with China.

The cyberattacks on the Electoral Commission took place sometime in August 2021. However, the attack only came to light last year. It affected several MPs and peers who were critical of China.

China Cyber Threats Readily Acknowledged

Recently, the prime minister called China “the greatest state-based challenge to our national security”. Rishi Sunak exclaimed, “China represents an economic threat to our security and an epoch-defining challenge, So it is right we take steps to protect ourselves.”

Acknowledging the attacks last August, the Electoral Commission announced that an unspecified threat actor had gained access to copies of the electoral registers and broken into its emails and digital control systems.

However, he added that it had no impact on any election or anyone’s registration status. Moreover, they were unable to predict exactly how many people were affected, but the register for each year contained the details of around 40 million people.

According to a report source, Deputy Prime Minister Oliver Dowden will address Parliament today about the threat. He suggested China is behind the attack, and laying out how the UK will respond to what it deems a wider threat.

Publicly identifying the attackers lays the groundwork for potential legal and political actions, such as sanctions or diplomatic protests.

The UK government is keen to highlights it has already rejected or dropped down Chinese investment in infrastructure in recent years on national security grounds.

Additionally, the three MPs who are among those targeted by the cyberattack – former Conservative leader Sir Iain Duncan Smith, former minister Tim Loughton and the SNP’s Stewart McDonald – will receive a briefing from the head of parliamentary security.